Diversity is Our Strength and Our Protection

Published January 14, 2021

One of the many reasons to love the McKinley Park neighborhood of Chicago is the natural protection afforded against hatred and bigotry by living in a multicultural community. As McKinley Park is a “majority-minority” area, with over 50 percent Latino residents and a burgeoning Asian-American population, overt hatred dares not openly show its face here, much less support for traitor Donald Trump.

Read more: Diversity is Our Strength and Our Protection

McKinley Park Catalyzed Parks Innovation Across Chicago and Nation

Published January 14, 2020

Local historian Mark Kinsella shares the deep history of McKinley Park. Join him on Wednesday, January 15, for the launch of the McKinley Park/Brighton Park Historical Society.

  • Local historian Mark Kinsella shares the deep history of our neighborhood's namesake park.
  • Learn more and help launch the McKinley Park/Brighton Park Historical Society on Wednesday, January 15.
  • McKinley Park remains an anchor for the area through its nearly 120-year history.

Read more: McKinley Park Catalyzed Parks Innovation Across Chicago and Nation

Our Neighborhood Deserves a Historical Society to Remember and Acknowledge Our Rich Heritage

The Marquette-Joliet marker at South Archer Avenue and South Leavitt Street memorializes one of the many historic events that took place in the McKinley Park neighborhood.
The Marquette-Joliet marker at South Archer Avenue and South Leavitt Street memorializes one of the many historic events that took place in the McKinley Park neighborhood.
Published November 28, 2019

By Mark Kinsella

A small marker lies on the southwest corner of South Archer Avenue and South Leavitt Street, across from the 35th/Archer Orange Line station. Thousands pass this marker on their walk to the El and take little note of it: You have to look up close to see the drawing and words etched there. This is ironic, since this spot commemorates the passage of French explorers Father Jacques Marquette and Louis Joliet, an event that changed Chicago, United States and world history.

McKinley Park and its neighbor Brighton Park just to the southwest lie along a very historic corridor that led to the birth of Chicago, opened up a passage to international trade and made Chicago the transportation hub of the nation. This marker, the Orange Line and all the businesses on Archer Avenue rest on an ancient Native American trail that dates back thousands of years. It is the road that paralleled the route of the Illinois-Michigan Canal, which brought many Irish immigrants to the area. This main spine of the neighborhood is one of many local features that makes McKinley Park and Brighton Park one of the most historic stretches of geography in all of North America.

Read more: Our Neighborhood Deserves a Historical Society to Remember and Acknowledge Our Rich Heritage

Velma Thomas Honors Culture and Community Through Our Multilingual Curriculum

Published July 18, 2019

Giselle Sanchez SantiagoGiselle Sanchez SantiagoBy Giselle Sanchez Santiago, Teacher at Velma Thomas Early Childhood Center

"Ice cream, ice cream, quien quiere ice cream?!” was a frequently chanted phrase in our classroom right up until the last day of school at the Velma Thomas Early Childhood Center in McKinley Park. Among many other topics this year, my preschool classroom studied ice cream: the transactions around it, the money involved and the design and construction of stores. As with all our studies, we used as many tools as we could think of — digital cameras, one-on-one and small group conversations, walking field trips, and parent and cross-classroom collaboration — and it was all happening in Spanish.

Velma Thomas has undergone many transformations over the years, including leadership, teaching methods and language models. We are a Chicago Public Schools child-parent center, which puts an emphasis on building deep relationships with parents by involving them in the classroom, providing them with resources, and inviting them to see children as we do: curious, capable and autonomous holders of love and theories about the world.

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Chicago Needs a “Green New Deal” to Get Rid of Lead, Prioritize 12th Ward Residents

12th Ward Chicago City Council candidate Pete DeMay sits outside his home in the McKinley Park neighborhood.
12th Ward Chicago City Council candidate Pete DeMay sits outside his home in the McKinley Park neighborhood.
Published January 22, 2019

By Pete DeMay

As a parent of young children here in McKinley Park, I want to make sure that clean, safe drinking water flows to our community for the next generation and beyond. However, lead levels in Chicago tap water currently make this an impossibility, according to WBEZ and the Chicago Tribune. This brain-damaging lead in our water is due to the City of Chicago’s requirement that the metal be used for residential service lines: the pipes that bring water from the water main to your home. This practice lasted until 1986, decades after most municipalities abandoned it for obvious safety concerns.

So when construction or other disturbances like water meter installations or heavy equipment traffic shake lead particles loose from the pipes, they enter our drinking water, and readings spike to dangerous levels. Sadly, the city stuck with lead despite its known dangers due to well-documented political corruption, and we are all now left to deal with the mess.

Read more: Chicago Needs a “Green New Deal” to Get Rid of Lead, Prioritize 12th Ward Residents

Carbon Fee and Dividend Policies Would be a Boon for McKinley Park

Published May 15, 2018

By Noah Paulson

Climate change might seem like too big and far away an issue for the McKinley Park neighborhood, but addressing it would realize immediate local benefits. Although dramatic events like Chicago's 1995 heat wave may come to mind first, the burning of fossil fuels such as coal, oil and natural gas has other less obvious, but still deadly effects like increasing our risk for asthma, heart disease, cancer and other illnesses. This is in addition to problems from ongoing climate change caused by release of carbon into the air. We live in the middle of a hot spot: The American Lung Association's 2018 State of the Air report ranks Chicago as the 22nd most ozone-polluted American city.

A nationally enacted policy called Carbon Fee and Dividend would slow climate change, improve our local air quality and deliver significant boosts to the McKinley Park neighborhood economy. Here's how it could work.

Read more: Carbon Fee and Dividend Policies Would be a Boon for McKinley Park